Vines & Tines

It's all about the reindeer....and the parfaits. don't forget about the parfaits.

67,068 notes

crimsonhairedcelt:

brokenyouth5:

marysbrain:

Datamancer’s Steampunk Laptop

This may look like a Victorian music box, but inside this intricately hand-crafted wooden case lives a Hewlett-Packard ZT1000 laptop that runs both Windows XP and Ubuntu Linux. It features an elaborate display of clockworks under glass, engraved brass accents, claw feet, an antiqued copper keyboard and mouse, leather wrist pads, and customized wireless network card. The machine turns on with an antique clock-winding key by way of a custom-built ratcheting switch made from old clock parts.

OH MY HOLY HELLLLLL

(via dainesanddaffodils)

5,321 notes

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)
Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.
The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.
In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.
Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.
I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

africandogontheprairie:

Your choice affects your dog’s choice — a lesson I’m reminded of everyday. (Image credit goes to Lili Chin.)

Way back this winter, when Chalo started having growly reactions toward other dogs, I made the mistake of correcting him for it. Traditional wisdom and all the training books I’d read as a kid in the ’90s told me firm discipline was necessary, so I spoke sternly and used physical corrections with a choke collar. Surprise: in just 48 hours, it became so much worse. A little growliness turned into full-on explosions of snarling and lunging and raised hackles and high emotions. The changes were happening so quickly it frightened me. This was not a dog I recognized. So I backtracked, devoured every bit of reactivity literature I could find on the internet, and soon wondered if, in Chalo’s mind, the situation looked very different. To him, it seemed to be, “Every time we see a dog, my person gets worried and bad things happen. She becomes a person I do not recognize. I need to growl more to make that dog go away, and to keep bad things from happening.” My whole perspective on the issue changed — or at least, made me more receptive to alternatives, out of desperation and concern that I was singlehandedly ruining my dog.

The next day I approached it differently, with a soft, open, patient mindset and a bag full of cheese. And in one session, Chalo was sitting quietly and sweetly, twenty feet away from the golden retriever who previously sent him into a growling frenzy.

In one week, he was walking past yards of snarling, lunging, barking, frustrated dogs with the same sweet, quiet, expectant look on his face.

Today, Chalo hasn’t growled at another dog in months.

I definitely don’t propose that there is any one-size-fits-all training method for every dog, and everything I don’t know about dogs could fill several rooms several times over. But Chalo teaches me so much, all the time: how to be a better teacher, how to approach problems creatively, how to be patient, how to motivate. So many canine behavior problems are misunderstandings, rooted partly in a failure of human imagination and empathy. And that is fixable. That can change. Chalo continues to show me what I need to give more of, not just in dog training but in life in general — reflection on my own actions, and consideration for how we all can be shaped, battered, or buoyed by the world around us. Dogs can make us better, and this dog is making me better. 

382 notes

tamorapierce:

fytortall:

fandompicklechips:

Okay tamora pierce fans, weird question.
Which part of ” Salmalín” do you stress? Every time I read his name it I hear it as sort of a blur because I can’t decide which syllable to stress. I get that the last syllable is accented but that just doesn’t sound right to me.
So how do you hear it?

hmmm… I usually pronounce is Sal-ma-lynn

I pronounce it sahl-mahl-LEEN, if that helps.  ;-)

 And here it is in Arabic :) : سالمالين

0 notes

"You can tell a lot about someone by the type of music they listen to. Hit shuffle on your iPod, iTunes, phone, media player, etc, and write down the first twenty songs. Then pass this on to ten people. One rule: no skipping (only if you want to).”

1. Hejran- Niyaz (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReWH5MWzAnY)

2. The Banjo Song- Seasick Steve  (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4uItNDDqNo)

3. Dogs Were Barking- Gogol Bordello (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ykKXdcHooM)

4. Flying Horses- Dispatch (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jGxX7Mr-BQc)

5. Haste To The Wedding- The Corrs (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgvMSYZwT1o)

6. I’m On My Way- The Proclaimers (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1yYDuSf3C4)

7. Sea Of No Cares- Great Big Sea (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-aVgLQ2zulg&list=RD-aVgLQ2zulg)

8. The Desserters- Rachel Zeffira (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InCc8UwSyac)

9. Sincerely, Jane- Janelle Monae (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_WhE7mBwK8)

10. Hall Om Mig- Nanne (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PmufTk1AlqA)

11. Gati Bongo- Orchestre de Baka Gbine (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPa0t-7ua_0)

12. Deliver Us- Prince of Egypt Soundtrack (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3WKN0XF8-3Q)

13. Candy Shop- 50 Cent (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZKBa6bvUjo)

14. Whirring- The Joy Formidable (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2BUEzdjfpY)

15. Hot Boyz- Missy Elliott (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRkev5Aooms)

16. Azeem O Shaan Shahensha- A.R. Rahman (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ouBDeoG0fU)

17. Blinded- Third Eye Blind (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMTMiDDubE4)

18. St. Andrews - Bedouin Soundclash (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KMVq9l8KzM)

19. Dark Lady- Cher (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJclbQAeRr4)

20. Nantes- Beirut (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCkT4K-hppE)

Filed under music songs